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The tenured engineers of 2018

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The tenured engineers of 2018

The School of Engineering has announced that seven members of its faculty have been granted tenure by MIT.
“I am proud to announce this year’s cohort of newly tenured faculty in the School of Engineering,” said Anantha Chandrakasan, dean of the School of Engineering. “Their work as scholars and educators is inspiring to our entire community. We will benefit immensely from their work.”
This year’s newly tenured associate professors are:
Adam Chlipala, in the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, works to reduce the costs of developing complex computer systems and make them more reliable via formal program-proof methods.
Dirk Englund, in the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, is pursuing experimental and theoretical research toward quantum technologies using photons and semiconductor spins, combining techniques from atomic physics, optoelectronics, and modern nanofabrication.
Ken KamrinPhD ’08, in the Department of Mechanical Engineering, focuses on continuum fluid and solid mechanics, with an emphasis on highly-deforming bulk materials, in particular granular media.
Yury Polyanskiy, in the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, researches basic questions in information theory, error-correcting codes, wireless communication, and fault-tolerant and defect-tolerant circuits.
David SontagPhD ’10, the Hermann L. F. von Helmholtz Career Development Professor in the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, is working to create artificial intelligence technologies and machine learning algorithms that can take the data in electronic medical records, reason about a patient’s health, and ultimately help change health care to be proactive instead of reactive.
Vinod VaikuntanathanPhD ’09, in the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, studies encryption systems that protect the privacy of data, digital signatures that protect its integrity, and cryptographic protocols that allow mutually distrusting entities to collaborate and perform meaningful tasks while maintaining individual privacy.
Qiqi Wang, in the Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics, investigates engineering design involving chaotic dynamical systems, unsteady aerodynamics and turbulence, numerical methods for exascale computation, and design optimization under uncertainty.

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